The other week when I played in the Dynamic Discs  2 Disc Challenge, I wrote about how one hole destroyed my chances at any prize winnings. On the teepad, I was confident that I could at least par the now infamous hole. Alas, it was not to be, as the initial flight of the disc landed me in jail, big time.

Challenged

Playing on my favorite course, Veteran’s Park Original, I felt confident that I could score better than I had at the previous year’s event. Playing the course at least once a month, I knew each hole well and felt good about all but a couple of holes that were tough for everybody. The hole before disaster struck is one of those holes, on which neither of my two cardmates scored well on.

With two guardian trees before the fairway opens up to a left and right option, I normally can throw a forehand down the left side and end up thirty to forty feet short of the basket. There is a center line of trees that can cause problems if you don’t throw straight enough.

My Challenge

I whipped up a picture to show you how horrible my drive on Hole 7 really was. It’s pretty self explanatory, but just so you’ll know, the line is the flight path of my disc. The circle at the bottom right is the previous hole’s basket, which is at least 15 feet lower in elevation from 7’s tee pad.

Hole 7 misadventures

From the picture, you can see that I ended up well right of the basket and not very far in front. I was in jail something fierce. The brush is not terribly thick from where my disc was, but it was grown up enough that I had no clear path over top of everything. It was also close enough that I had no backhand or forehand path back to the fairway.

I opted for an overhand throw to try to clear the brush, but stay under the branches of the pine trees. The first throw from jail went thirty or forty feet, hit a branch, and nestled in the carpet of pine needles that covered the ground. The same happened for my second throw, while my third throw after my drive finally made it to the fairway.

For my fifth throw on the hole, I made it to within the circle for a putt. I can’t recall whether I hit the band or basket on my putt, though it doesn’t matter, as I took a 7 on the hole. Adding that to one bogey and two doubles already carded, I was seven over after seven holes. Not good.

My Takeaway

Yeah, I had a bad front nine. The back nine was coming up, and I know those holes aren’t nearly as tough as a whole. On the holes eight and nine, my memory of hole 7 was pretty much gone. Taking a couple of pars, and using short memory allowed me to focus on each hole as a one hole course.

One bad hole didn’t define my day on the course. I was even able to nab a couple of birdies on the back nine. Albeit on short holes, a birdie is a birdie when looking at the scorecard. And the fact that I was limited to just two discs played a large factor.

Limiting Choices

Listening to the last Disc Golf Answer Man episode of the year, a question brought up the issue of having to many choices in your bag. Commenting on the 2 Disc Challenges that he had been to, Bobby Brown said he had heard many players say they had carded their best ever rounds during the Challenge. And those best scores come from your limit of discs to choose from in whatever situation you get yourself into. 

With the limited choice of disc, it becomes hard to blame the disc for a bad throw. It’s only a disc. Just like any gun you might own, it can’t fire itself, and neither can a disc throw itself down the fairway into a tree and kick into trouble. Even if I had been carrying my full bag with ~20 discs, none of them could have told the others to head for a tree and see what happens.

What Bad Break?

Short memory, fewer molds, two discs. There are as many ways to temper a bad hole on an otherwise good round. Like Tim over at Mind Body Disc said in his latest Wisdom Wednesday post titled Simplify. It can greatly impact your life or disc golf game. 

When you take things in stride and don’t blow up because your disc hit that Iron Leaf, you’ll walk to your car after the end of you round and say, what bad break?

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